NFL horse collar rules, explained

NFL horse collar rules, explained

NEW ORLEANS, LOUISIANA – OCTOBER 31: Jameis Winston # 2 of the New Orleans Saints is injured after being tackled by Devin White # 45 of the Tampa Bay Buccaneers throughout the 2nd quarter at Caesars Superdome on October 31, 2021 in New Orleans, Louisiana. (Photo by Sean Gardner/Getty Images).
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Tampa Bay Buccaneers linebacker Devin White was required a horse collar penalty throughout Sundays video game versus the New Orleans Saints.
Among the more exciting games of Sundays slate of Week 8 games was the battle in between the Tampa Bay Buccaneers and New Orleans Saints. The Saints warded off a late comeback effort by the safeguarding Super Bowl champions, however there was one play that stood out for the game.
In the 2nd quarter, Saints quarterback Jameis Winston was reduced by the arm by Buccaneers linebacker Devin White, resulting in him getting carted to the locker room with what was exposed to be a torn ACL. Following the play, White was required a horse collar take on penalty.
So what is a horse collar deal with penalty, you ask? We have you covered.
NFL horse collar rules, discussed.
A horse collar deal with is when a defender pulls a player to the ground by the inside of the collar or the side of the shoulder pads or jersey. If the on-field authorities deems that a gamer has committed a horse collar deal with, they will be evaluated a 15-yard penalty and the opposing team will get an automated initially down.
Here is the official explanations of the rule, courtesy of NFL Football Operations:.

Based off the main judgment, this is why White was called for the horse collar charge and the Saints were rewarded with 15-yards and an automated initially down.

No player shall grab the within collar of the back or the side of the shoulder pads or jersey, or get the jersey at the name plate or above, and pull the runner towards the ground. This does not apply to a runner who remains in the tackle box or to a quarterback who is in the pocket.
Keep in mind: It is not needed for a player to pull the runner completely to the ground in order for the act to be illegal. If his knees are buckled by the action, it is a nasty, even if the runner is not pulled entirely to the ground.