Ryan Crouser sends message to grandpa after breaking Olympic record (Photo)

Ryan Crouser sends message to grandpa after breaking Olympic record (Photo)

Households arent able to be in Tokyo to cheer on the athletes this year. For some, thats merely because of limitations originating from the COVID-19 pandemic. For others, the factors are much sadder.
Ryan Crouser lost his grandpa the day prior to he left to compete in his 2nd Olympics. After winning gold for a 2nd time, he found a heartfelt way to express his love and thankfulness to the guy who got him into tossing with a piece of white paper and a marker.
” Grandpa, we did it. 2020 Olympic Champion!” Crouser wrote.

Maturing, Crouser utilized to experiment his grandpa in his yard. There isnt a much better method to honor him than doing what he carried out in Tokyo.
Ryan Crouser competed at the Olympics in honor of his late grandfather.
Extremely, all three of Crousers throws were Olympic records. The very first at 74 feet, 11 inches broke his Olympic record from 2016 in Rio when he won gold for the first time.
Crousers mark was more than 2 feet clear of silver medalist Joe Kovacs, a fellow American. Thomas Walsh of New Zealand took bronze.

Team USAs Ryan Crouser in the maless shot at the 2021 Olympics. (Kirby Lee-USA TODAY Sports).
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Guys shot put champion Ryan Crouser composed a heartfelt message to his grandpa after breaking his own record for gold at the Olympics.
Winning gold at the Olympics is a remarkable accomplishment. To be able to share that minute with your family would take it over the top.

Crouser composed.

After Ryan Crouser won gold in guyss shot put he took out a sign for his grandfather which checked out, “Grandpa, we did it!”.
His indication remained in homage to his late grandpa who got him into the sport. pic.twitter.com/Az8rA7nBqd.
— Peacock (@peacockTV) August 5, 2021.

Exceptionally, all three of Crousers tosses were Olympic records. The first at 74 feet, 11 inches broke his Olympic record from 2016 in Rio when he won gold for the first time. His second effort bested that one at 75 feet, 2 3/4 inches. Breaking his record again, he tossed it 76 feet, 5 1/2 inches.